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June 27, 2013

Green Cards for Same-Sex Couples -- Yes, We Can!

Rainbow yes.pngOn Tuesday, 26 June 2013, the Supreme Court of the United States overturned the constitutionally discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). A US citizen or Legal Permanent Resident may now submit an immigration petition for a same-sex spouse.  This is historic news and a true change in the way immigration law will be applied to the community of immigrants. The telephone has not stopped ringing at either the Palm Springs office or the Los Angeles.

Even as we consider moving forward for the paperwork to unite our families, some things to keep in mind.

Among the key requirements is MARRIAGE. Civil unions, domestic partnerships, civil registrations, PACS, and other forms of "marriage lite" are NOT recognized. Only marriage: plain, old-fashioned, garden-variety marriage. The list of jurisdictions where same-sex marriages are currently permitted includes New York, Washington state, Massachusetts, and nine other jurisdictions plus the District of Columbia; and Argentina, France, Canada, South Afrika, and a significant number of other nations. A good list can be found here.

Here in California, Gov. Jerry Brown has ordered the state to begin issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples as soon as the stay is lifted on the lower court order. This should happen within about 30 days.

For immigration purposes, the marriage must be legal where it was celebrated. As long it is as it is legal where it was performed, it can be used for legal permanent resident ("green card") purposes. Processing time is currently about four to six months, from the time of the application until the interview in Los Angeles or Riverside California. For those interviewing outside the United States, at US embassies and consulates, the process will take approximately 8 months, start to finish.  Fiancé(e) cases are a bit more complex and will take an additional few weeks.

Not surprisingly, all of the other immigration law issues, such as criminal records, financial sponsorships, prior deportations, unlawful status, and so on, still apply to same-sex couples, so it would be wise to set up a time to chat as soon as possible with an experiences immigration attorney.

After 30 years of counseling and advising couples from the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender communities, it is thrilling to be able to counsel our community through this momentous change and opportunity in the law.

This has been a long time coming. If you or anyone you know might benefit from the court ruling, please do not hesitate to contact the office. Meetings can be arranged at either the Los Angeles office or the office in Palm Springs.

Los Angeles Office:
6255 W Sunset Blvd, Ste 915
Los Angeles, CA 90028-7410

Palm Springs Office
777 E Tahquitz Canyon, Ste 328
Palm Springs, CA 92262

The contact phone is the same for both offices. Please feel free to give us a call (323.769.8187) to set up an appointment as soon as possible. Best and warmest regards!

February 4, 2013

National Visa Center I-601A Letter Misleads Many Immigrants

NVC ltr.JPGIn January 2013, the US Department of State's National Visa Center (NVC) began sending letters to many prospective immigrants about the "I-601A PROVISIONAL WAIVER OF UNLAWFUL PRESENCE." This letter is scaring the living daylights out of thousands of immigrants. At Law Offices of J Craig Fong in Los Angeles and Palm Springs, I have fielded about one hundred inquiries about this letter.

The first and most important thing to remember is: this letter and the I-601A Provisional Waiver ONLY -- repeat ONLY -- apply to a future immigrant if s/he is currently in the USA unlawfully, or has been unlawfully present in the USA in the past. Someone is illegally present if s/he enters the USA without inspection at a border post or airport, or if the person enters legally and then overstays the time granted on their landing permit.

If the future immigrant has never -- ever -- been in the USA, this letter and the I-601A waiver does not apply to him/her.

For some people who do indeed need the waiver -- if they overstayed or entered without any papers -- they should take a look at my blog from earlier this month.

If you have questions about whether you or a relative might need an I-601 or an I-601A waiver, it is very important to consult with a competent immigration attorney. --jcf

February 1, 2013

DACA: Work Permits for Childhood Arrivals - Still Available

Last summer, President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program which would allow some young people who were brought to the United States at a very young age to obtain an Employment Authorization Document (EAD - a work permit). With all the discussion of amnesty and Comprehensive Immigration Reform, I still get people asking me here at the immigration Law Offices of J Craig Fong whether this DACA program still exists.

It does.

To qualify for the program, a successful applicant must show that s/he:
* arrived in the USA before age 16;
* has resided in the USA since 15 June 2007;
* is currently in school, has graduated from high school, has obtained a general education development certificate, or is honorably discharged veterans of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;
* has not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety; and
* is not over the age of thirty.

Needed documents include:
* birth certificate
* two passport-size photos
* high school and/or university transcript -- diplomas are helpful, too

If you have questions about the DACA program, please feel free to contact me at my office. --jcf

January 30, 2013

Major Overhaul to Immigration Law May be Coming

Nation of Imm.jpgFor over 10 years, immigrants and their families have come to the immigration Law Offices of J Craig Fong and asked me about any possible changes to the immigration law that will help them. I hear, from clients in Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Canada, the United Kingdom, France, and many other places that they need some change in the immigration law to allow them to stay in this country and pursue their dreams, work productively, be free from persecution, and most importantly, to be united with their families.

For the first time since 1990, a major change in the immigration law may be coming.

You probably already know that the US Congress has been deadlocked for over 4 years, with the members (mostly) of one political party refusing to cooperate with the White House. As a result, a Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) bill has never been seriously discussed. With the results of the recent re-election of President Barack Obama, and (many) members of the Republican party realizing that it is in their best interest to help immigrants, CIR may be on its way. What will it do?

No one knows!

So why am I writing this blog?

For the next few months, you will be reading many ideas, proposals, suggestions, conditions, demands, arguments, and so on about CIR. For right now, you need to know that NOTHING has been decided. Most immigration law observers believe that we will have some real, concrete details before the end of February. Some possibilities:

* A pathway to legalization, or an earned path to residency, for those undocumented people who are already here. This possibility is likely to have a requirement for paying back taxes, paying a fine, and learning English or taking a basic English test. We do not know any more right now.

* A category of immigration for the same-sex couples, where one partner is a US citizen and the other is a foreigner. This possibility is likely to require proof that the couple has been in an exclusive, emotionally inter-dependent relationship for a minimum period of time -- likely, two years. We do not know any more right now.

* A large database of all persons eligible to work in the USA. In order for ANYone get get a job, employers may be asked to register with or check this database to verify that employees are legally eligible to work in the USA. Will they do such checking for foreigners only, or will this include US citizens? We do not know any more right now.

* A big push for even stronger border control, both at the Southern Border with México, the Northern Border with Canada, and at all airports. This might include enhanced exit control, also, to record not only who enters the USA and when, but also who exits. We do not know any more right now.

Remember: nothing has been decided right now. There is no new law right now. You do not need to register. You do not need to sign up. You do not need to file any form right now.

There are many notarios and others who are not licensed to practice law. In order to get money from you, they will try to scare you into thinking that you might do something now in order to preserve an immigration benefit. Please remember: there is NO new law right now.

Good news is coming. Be patient.

If you have questions, if you would like to consult with me, please feel free to give me a call, and I would be happy to discuss your situation or that of your family. --jcf


January 7, 2013

Illegal Presence Waiver Can Now be Processed in USA

Alt Route Waver.jpgOver many years, the immigration Law Offices of J Craig Fong has counseled many immigrants who have come to the USA without passport or visa, or who have come legally but overstayed. In many of these case, it has not been possible to process the paperwork for an immigrant visa (the green card) without first having the immigrant depart the USA to go back to the US Embassy in the home country for an interview. In some cases, this means that the immigrant must file an I-601 Waiver of Ground of Inadmissibility at the US Embassy and wait months for a decision. And if the I-601 is denied, the immigrant cannot be reunited with family in the USA for 3 or 10 years!

For this reason, many green-card eligible applicants are afraid to leave the USA for their interview; they are afraid that if their I-601 waiver is denied, they will not be able to return to their families for 10 years. The risk of NOT being granted the waiver is too great, so they have avoided legalizing altogether.

Until now.

In early January 2013, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced a new procedure. This new procedure -- called the I-601A Provisional Waiver -- still requires the immigrant-applicant to apply for the waiver, to seek a pardon for coming to the USA without papers, or for overstaying. However, this request for a waiver can now be filed before departure from the USA and before going to the interview at the American Embassy. In this way, the immigrant-applicant will know provisionally whether they will be able to return quickly after their Embassy interview or not -- before leaving the USA.

Continue reading "Illegal Presence Waiver Can Now be Processed in USA" »

January 1, 2013

Law Offices of J Craig Fong

Changes Ahead2.jpgAfter practicing law together for almost one decade, Eileen Chun-Fruto and I have evolved into different forms of law practice. I will continue to practice immigration and nationality law, handle consultations, and do my blog here at my offices in Los Angeles and in Palm Springs. The firm name is now, "Law Offices of J Craig Fong." You can reach me, as before, at Tel: +1.323.769.8187 -- this is the same phone number you have used in the past. My new e-mail address is: j@jfonglaw.com . My webpage is now: http://www.jfonglaw.com .

My practice will continue to focus on families, waivers, small business investors, intra-company transferees, and investor visas. Also, as I have been for all 30 years of my law work, I remain very devoted to counseling, advocating for, and working with non-traditional families.

Eileen Chun-Fruto now practices immigration law with a law firm in downtown Los Angeles. She can be reached at echun@fongandchun.com.

Law offices change forms for many reasons. Eileen and I have parted as friends and colleagues. If for any reason you have questions about your case with the former office of Fong & Chun, llp, you are free to contact either one of us. We are now -- as we always were before -- committed to high quality immigration law work, where each case is treated individually and with respect for your family, your business, and your concerns. --jcf

June 29, 2012

Papers Needed for Deferred Action for Undocumented Young People

papers.jpgAt our offices in Los Angeles and in Palm Springs, the immigration attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong have been receiving hundreds of phone calls about the President's recently-announced initiative to provide Deferred Action to certain undocumented young people, providing them with work permits (Employment Authorization Documents - EAD).

On 15 June 2012, President Obama announced that he was directing US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to provide EADs to undocumented young people who meet certain qualifications. A successful applicant must show that s/he:
* arrived in the USA before age 16;
* has resided in the USA since 15 June 2007;
* is currently in school, has graduated from high school, has obtained a general education development certificate, or is honorably discharged veterans of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;
* has not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety; and
* is not over the age of thirty.

It is not yet possible to submit an application for this Deferred Action EAD. We expect to have details and how and where to apply sometime before 15 August 2012.

Until then, what can a potential applicant do to get ready?
1. Get a certified copy of your birth certificate.
2. If you arrived in the USA with a passport, visa, or border crossing card, be sure to keep this document safe -- it will demonstrate when you arrived in the USA.
3. If you did not arrive in the USA with a passport or other travel document, then try to look for documents that show you were in the USA as of 15 June 2007. Such documents might include: school records, medical records, dental records, baptismal or other church records, and photos.
4. Get a certified copy of your complete school record.

We do NOT recommend that a potential applicant get a copy of his/her criminal record at this time.

Making an application for Deferred Action is a big step, and it can have good and bad consequences. It is critically important that you understand all the possibilities before making the application. If you would like to discuss Deferred Action for yourself, a family member, or a friend, contact the immigration attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong: +1.323.769.8187 --jcf

March 23, 2012

Applying for TPS - Syria

Map Syria.jpgTime to apply? Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Syrians in the US! The USCIS has just announced that Syria will now be a designated country for temporary protected status. Due to the political instability in Syria, Syrians who are now in the United States will soon be able to apply for TPS which will allow them to be granted employment authorization and for extensions of the TPS designation is extended for Syria. The initial TPS designation will be for 18 months. USCIS has instructed applicants NOT to submit applications yet but applications may be prepared now in anticipation of more guidance next week. Remember that TPS is not automatic and applicants will have to show their eligibility, and background checks will still be conducted of all applicants. Those who will be found ineligible are those who have multiple convictions or other factors but certain noncriminal and non-security grounds can be waived. If you are interested in applying for TPS, call Law Offices of J Craig Fong for a consultation. ---ecf

January 6, 2012

Proposed Change May Allow Immigration Waiver for Undocumented

changes ahead.jpgThe Obama Administration has proposed a change in immigration regulations which would potentially change the lives of undocumented immigrants in the USA.

Maybe the most common problem we see as immigration lawyers is the person who entered the USA with no documentation, or who had a visa but overstayed -- the so-called "undocumented alien." This problem is enormous and affects our clients throughout the nation, not only those at our The Law Offices of J Craig Fong offices in Los Angeles or Palm Springs.

This is very complicated, so please read carefully:

(1) With few exceptions, an undocumented alien can only interview for a green card by going back to his/her home country to have an interview at the US Embassy. The CATCH is that when someone like this departs the country, s/he triggers a ten-year bar, and s/he will not be allowed to return for ten years, even if s/he otherwise qualifies for the green card.

(2) There is one exception to this bar: if the undocumented alien goes to the interview and is barred from coming back to the USA, the applicant can file a "waiver," explaining that some US citizen (or legal permanent resident) will suffer "severe Hardship" if the applicant is not allowed to return. At this time, the waiver can only be filed at the US Embassy at the time of the applicant's interview. The means that the applicant ends up waiting abroad for months waiting for a decision. If the waiver is NOT granted, the applicant cannot return.

(3) If this regulatory change is approved, the Obama Administration would allow the applicant to apply for this waiver BEFORE the applicant leaves to the home country. This would be an enormous benefit. If the waiver is granted, the applicant goes to the Embassy interview and comes back, no 10-year bar. If the waiver is NOT granted, then the applicant just stays put in the US, and avoids going home to be denied and excluded.

This is not an amnesty.

This proposed change allows those who can be legalized to get a green card through the regular immigration process. The only change would be applying for the waiver before departure from the USA. The impact of this small change would have an enormous impact on individuals and families in Los Angeles and throughout Southern California. Right now, this is only a proposal -- it is NOT YET IN EFFECT.

The lawyers at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong have talked to hundreds if not thousands of people over the years who can benefit from this potential change. Stay tuned. As soon as this change goes into effect, we will be post additional information. --jcf

January 3, 2012

Don't Play with Fire! - Immigration vs the Aggravated Felon

Matches.jpgThe recent Los Angeles arson situation brings to mind many people who have consulted the attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong in our Los Angeles and Palm Springs offices. They have a valid visa or legal permanent residence (green card), and they have been convicted of a crime. Sometimes it is a serious crime; sometimes it is something minor. In some of these cases, the conviction has virtually unfixable immigration consequences.

In 1990, Congress created the concept of "aggravated felonies," crimes that are considered so bad that an alien might not even qualify for the typical defenses to deportation (removal), such as asylum, cancellation of removal, or withholding of removal. In other words, the Congress has simply decided that someone who has committed an "aggravated felony" should just be deported (removed) regardless of the defenses s/he might try to use.

The name "aggrevated felony" is misleading. "Aggravated felony" includes such obviously serious crimes as murder, rape, or arson; we can all agree that these crimes are quite serious. However, "aggravated felony" can also include some less- obviously terrible crimes, such as attempted possession of stolen property, attempted robbery, petty theft, trespass, unauthorized use of a vehicle. Even if a crime was charged as a misdemeanor in the legal system, it can still be considered an "aggravated felony" for immigration purposes.

Congress defines an "aggravated felony" as:
(1) murder, rape, or sexual abuse of a minor;
(2) illicit trafficking in controlled substances;
(3) illicit trafficking in firearms or destructive devices;
(4) any offense related to laundering of monetary instruments in connection with certain unlawful activity;
(5) offenses relating to transportation, receiving, or using explosives, forearms, or ammunition;
(6) using fire (arson) or an explosives to commit any felony or causing an explosion during the commission of any felony; and the catch-all category,
(7) crimes of violence -- which can also, in some circumstances, include theft, burglary, lewd conduct, simple battery, threats, and statutory rape; and
(8) some other Federal and state laws.

As you can see, this a very broad list of crimes.

We caution all our clients who have green cards or who have temporary visas to contact us if they have any contact with law enforcement so that we can evaluate the nature of the underlying crime. Please remember that even if you are already present in the USA, if you commit an "aggravated felony," you could trigger arrest or a deportation (removal) if you try to apply for an extension of stay, a renewal of your green card, a change of status, an adjustment of status (green card), or if you re-enter the USA after a brief absence.

If you have more questions about "aggravated felonies," please contact an experienced immigration attorney. --jcf

October 11, 2011

What Happens When a Family Petitioner Dies?

headstones.jpgLately, the attorneys at the immigration Law Offices of J Craig Fong have been fielding a number of inquiries from families about what to do when their petitioner passes away. These inquiries have been especially common from our offices in Los Angeles and Palm Springs. Clients will usually ask if there is a way that they can obtain a substitute sponsor. This is known as requesting "humanitarian reinstatement" of the petition from the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services, or USCIS.

For example, a father became a naturalized citizen in 1996 and then immediately filed a petition for his adult son in the Philippines. Although the petition was quickly approved, the priority date would not become current for many years due to the backlog and demand for visas. This delay is due to the Priority Date system used by USCIS and Department of State to determine who is next-in-line. Unfortunately, during the waiting period, the father passed away. Under current regulations, an approved petition is automatically revoked upon the death of the petitioner. The surviving members of the family reside in the United States. Certain members of the family would be eligible to be the substitute sponsor for purposes of the affidavit of support, but the first step would be to request that USCIS reinstate the petition.

In order to do so, USCIS considers the following factors:

(1) Disruption of an established family unit; (2) Hardship to Citizens and lawful permanent residents; (3) A beneficiary who is elderly or in poor health; (4) A beneficiary who has had lengthy residence in the United States; (5) A beneficiary who has no home to go to; (6) Undue delay by USCIS or consular officers in processing the petition and the visa; and (7) a beneficiary who has strong family ties in the United States.

Prior to submitting a request, clients should work closely with their attorneys to assemble a strong evidentiary package that addresses each of the factors that USCIS considers. Bear in mind: the decision to reinstate a petition is completely within the discretion of USCIS. Humanitarian reinstatement applies to beneficiaries outside the United States. Beneficiaries residing inside the United States when the petitioner passes away may be able to avail themselves of Section 204(L) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong are always available to help guide you through this process. --ra

October 6, 2011

The World Mourns Steve Jobs

Green apple standing out.jpgToday the world mourns Steve Jobs. Steve Jobs was the creator and visionary at Apple, Inc. but he is remembered as one of the world's greatest business leaders, ranking up there with the likes of Ford and Rockefeller. Steve Jobs was credited for bringing technology and it's benefits to the every day lives of every day people. The attorneys at Law Offices of J Craig Fong want to thank Steve Jobs for changing how we think about technology, for inspiring us to think creatively in what we do as immigration attorneys.

Law Offices of J Craig Fong is proud to run our office on Apple technology. We love our Apple computers, iPhones and iPads. But more importantly, the immigration attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong have also embraced the entrepreneurial spirit and determination which is best exemplified by Steve Job's own words:

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.

As immigration lawyers, we know that the law allows families to reunify, it gives foreign workers and entrepreneurs a chance to realize their dreams. What we do at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong gives people a chance in a lifetime to make a change for the better. Many, many of our clients come to us after other immigration attorneys have turned their cases away hearing their employers were too small, too new to sponsor an H-1b or that a new company L-1 is just impossible these days. Or perhaps their family members were facing removal or in desperate need of an immigration waiver but that odds were against them so that it wasn't worth trying. at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong, we don't provide formulaic solutions to challenges. Steve Jobs didn't do that and neither do we. Challenging cases require exacting solutions. We work on each case with the individualized attention that each case deserves and we have the years of experience to know what works and what does not. When other immigration attorneys won't make the extra effort to take on cases that are outside the norm, we do - because this is what makes our work meaningful, and this is what inspires us to create great work and to make a difference, a world of difference to the individuals who didn't settle and tried anyhow. --ecf

September 27, 2011

DV Lottery Begins October 4, 2011

Opportunity in the sky.jpgFollowing this past year's diversity lottery fiasco, the US Department of State has announced that it will begin accepting applications for DV 2013 at noon (EDT) on October 4, 2011. The application period will close on November 4, 2011 at noon (EDT).

It has only been a few months since Dept of State notified then revoked the winning results of 22,000 "winning" lottery applicants. In the incident, now commonly known as "22,000 tears," the DOS reported that a computer glitch caused 90% of the DV2012 winners to be selected from applications made during the first 2 days of the 30-day application period, and that because of this, the results were not "randomized," and hence, invalid. DOS states that it "mistakenly informed" these unfortunate 22,000 "winners," some of whom had already started making plans and selling off assets to move to the US and begin their American Dream.

As we look ahead, some changes have been made to the countries whose nationals can now participate in the DV 2013 lottery. Nationals of South Sudan and Poland are now eligible to submit applications and although mainland Chinese born applicants cannot participate, Hong Kong SAR, Macau, and Taiwanese applicants may still apply. While the Los Angeles visa attorneys at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong, wish the best of luck to all DV 2013 applicants, we also remember and sympathize with the 22,000 individuals of DV 2012. --ecf

August 19, 2011

Beware of Notarios and other Immigration Scams

handshake.jpgThe immigration Law Offices of J Craig Fong serves the entire Los Angeles area, including Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley, Long Beach, and indeed, clients all around the United States. We handle family visas, business and investor visas, and removal / deportation cases. Our attorneys frequently encounter people who come in and say that they have been working with an "immigration service" or "immigration consultant" or "notario" or "notary public" for the processing of their paperwork. In the vast majority of these cases, the results obtained by these so-called service-providers have been devastating.

The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced a nationwide program to target non-attorney notaries and others who are advising and preparing paperwork for clients. The immigration system is complex, and although DHS often views attorneys as a hinderance to its work, DHS also understands that the only way an immigrant gets proper representation, a fair hearing, is through a competent, licensed attorney.

This is a difficult subject, because those of us at the Law Offices of J Craig Fong have met and seen the work of a few excellent, conscientious, knowledgeable notaries. However, to be frank, these are a great exception. In truth, notaries have no legal training and have no requirement to stay up-to-date in their knowledge. Attorneys do.

It is also true that not every attorney is going to be a good fit with every client: as you seek an immigration attorney, please ask yourself:

* Is this person a licensed attorney? If you're not sure, ask the state bar association.

* Does this lawyer have the experience to handle my case? Ask whether s/he has handled such a case before. Ask how long s/he has been licensed to practice. Some attorneys TEACH immigration law to other attorneys. This is a pretty good sign that the attorney has solid practical experience.

* Is this attorney listening to me? Some attorneys handle cases in mass quantities and do not make the effort to know you, your family, or your business.

* Is this attorney telling me what s/he is going to do? Some attorneys will just say, "it's ok, just leave it with me. I will take care of it." This is not good. You need to know what is being done by the attorney in your name. In the end, you are responsible for what the attorney files if you sign the papers.

* Is this attorney willing to explain things to me? Immigration law is a field of law where the client must understand what's going on; your future in this country depends on being knowledgeable. Does this attorney explain things to you clearly and in a way that you understand?

* Do I fundamentally trust this attorney? You are putting your family or business in the hands of this professional. Look him or her in the eye and ask yourself, "is this person honest, clear, and straight-forward?"

* Is this attorney a member of a reputable immigration law association? Merely being a member of any ole' professional organizations is not the key here; any lawyer can write a check to join an organization. However, some organizations require a minimum number of years in practice before an attorney can apply to be admitted to membership. It should raise a little bit of concern if your attorney is NOT a member of, or active with, any such organizations. The main professional organizations for immigration attorneys are the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and the Federal Bar Association (Immigration Section).

--jcf

June 27, 2011

New York: "I do!" -- USCIS: "Not yet, pal!"

couple hold hands.jpgCongratulations to the citizens of New York for the practical and humane approach taken by their Legislature and Governor in the approval of same-sex marriage last week! As leading advocates for immigrants in the gay and lesbian community, the attorneys at Los Angeles' Law Offices of J Craig Fong have counseled thousands of clients from all over the nation and the world about uniting families which are not traditionally shaped.

Beware! It is still NOT possible for same-sex couples to marry and to have the US citizen spouse petition for legal permanent resident status (the so-called green card) for the foreign spouse. This prohibition applies even when the couple both marries and resides in New York.

A same-sex marriage in New York (or from any other state or country, for that matter) will not be recognized for purposes of Federal immigration benefits. This includes Family Petitions for alien spouses, and also includes spouse-as-dependent on any other residency application. The culprit here is the Federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).

The Uniting American Families Act (UAFA) would remedy this, permitting the recognition for immigration purposes of domestic partners who are in a committed same-sex relationship. This bill is regularly introduced in Congress. It is not yet law, however.

So, New Yorkers, raise a glass to your friends, families, and loved ones. And stay patient on the repeal of DOMA or the passage of UAFA. --jcf