Articles Posted in Avoiding Deportation

You mean prosecutorial discretion can apply to immigration casesProsecutorial discretion: What it means and how it can affect immigration cases

The Los Angeles Times recently reported that immigration court case closures due to prosecutorial discretion appear to be on the rise. This means more cases are being temporarily closed due to the artful use of prosecutorial discretion.
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Save children from deportation

How automatic citizenship can keep children from being deported

Over the years, I have met with families whose sons or daughters have been placed into removal proceedings. During the course of our meetings, I will learn that Junior (or Junior-ette) came to the United States as a lawful permanent resident at a young age. Then Junior committed a crime that triggers the government’s deportation machinery. Then I will ask the parents: did one of you become a naturalized U.S. citizen before his 18th birthday?
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I’m a green card holder with a prior conviction. Am I able to leave and come back to the United States?Green Card Holder International Travel With Conviction

What you should know about traveling internationally if you’ve had a prior conviction.

Over the years, I have encountered this scenario multiple times: “I have a green card. A long time ago, I had some trouble with the law and I pled no contest to [some crime]. It’s been so long ago that I forgot about it. I have left the country and re-entered using my green card at least twenty times. But just last week, as I was coming back from my vacation, they told me at the airport that they want to start court proceedings to take away my green card based upon that old conviction.”
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All non-US citizens inside the US are required by law to notify the government of any changes of their addresses. This is a cautionary tale about what can happen if they don’t.

One recent Monday evening, a client came to me because, just a few short hours earlier, his wife had been arrested and taken into custody during their immigration interview. During our consultation, he provided me with the following background information.

His wife previously lived in Minnesota. Her then-husband didn’t trust lawyers, so they submitted all of the paperwork to USCIS on their own. Unfortunately, the marriage didn’t work out and they got divorced. Wanting a fresh start, she moved to California.