No Reliability from Republican Candidates on Immigration Reform

January 24, 2012

Question Mark.jpgThe 2012 Republican presidential candidates have done nothing to speak clearly about immigration law and reform. Instead of speaking in clear, grown-up terms about immigration policy, they are using volatile language, demonizing immigrants. This does not advance any discussion; it is just pandering and solves nothing. This cheap talk from the Republican field is causing concern, dismay, and even panic for some of the clients of the Law Offices of J Craig Fong, in our offices in Los Angeles, Palm Springs, and elsewhere.

In a recent article in the New York Times, candidate Mitt Romney has reportedly abandoned his usually anti-immigrant rhetoric. Why? Because he's campaigning in Florida, where over 22% of the population is of Hispanic origin! So, what is his true position? And can he be relied on to stick to it?

Candidate Newt Gingrich is not much better, because although Gingrich has rightfully observed that the USA cannot simply deport all undocumented immigrants, he has proposed few concrete solutions.

Both Romney and Gingrich have spoken in favor of one part of the so-called DREAM Act. The DREAM Act would allow young people who were brought to the USA, and who have gone to high school in the USA, to legalize their immigration status, PROVIDED (1) they perform military or other public service, or (2) they pursue post-high school education. Romney and Gingrich are saying that they would support part of the DREAM Act for those who would serve in the military -- but not for those who complete college. In other words, Romney and Gingrich would legalize those who would risk death in the name of the USA, but NOT for those who would go to college to improve the US workforce!

As we move further into this election year, it is important to recognize that the Obama Administration has tried to get the cooperation of Congress on some types of immigration reform -- and Congress has refused. It is NOT a question of whether Obama should be doing more. It is MORE a question of whether Congress will cooperate on anything the Obama Administration would propose. And given that Congress cannot even agree on when to have LUNCH, I doubt they're going to agree on immigration reform.

As the year wears on, we will try to discuss some possible immigration reforms -- reforms which will NOT create a new amnesty, NOT create a new program, but will create humane solutions. --jcf